\ \ \ s
  info@biomedres.us   +1 (720) 414-3554
  One Westbrook Corporate Center, Suite 300, Westchester, IL 60154, USA

Biomedical Journal of Scientific & Technical Research

April 15, 2020, Volume 27, 1, pp 20461-20465

Research Article

Research Article

Bacteriological Examination of Cooked Meat and Chicken Meals

Tetsu Niwa*, Takashi Okazaki, Takuya Hara and Yutaka Imai

Author Affiliations

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Japan

Received: March 26, 2020 | Published: April 15, 2020

Corresponding author: Tetsu Niwa, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara, 259-1193, Japan

DOI: 10.26717/BJSTR.2020.27.004444

Abstract

Sixty random samples (15 of each) were collected from different restaurants to evaluate their bacteriological quality The mean values of APC, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform counts(cfu/g) were 6.03×103 ± 1.45×103, 3.16×103 ± 0.72×103, 7.43×102 ± 1.05×102 for meat, 8.58×103 ± 1.65×103 ,6.53×103 ± 1.24×103, 9.18×102 ± 2.07×103 for chicken, 9.91×103 ± 2.18×103, 5.25×103 ± 0.86×103, 1.06×103 ± 0.19×102 for beef kofta and 2.03×104 ± 0.43×104, 9.14×103 ± 2.06×103, 3.32×103 ± 0.45×103 for chicken kofta, respectively. The results showed that 12 isolates of E.coli were identified from examined ready to eat chicken and meat meals with different percentages(O26 : H11, O111 : H4, O124, O78,O91 : H21, O121 : H7, O127 : H6, O146 : H21) E.coli strains were serologically identified from such examined meals, there are 6 isolates of salmonella were identified from examined samples. Also, there are 21 isolates of staph. aureus were isolated from examined samples represented as 20% from meat,40% from beef kofta,33.33% from chicken and 46.67% from chicken kofta.

Introduction

Cooked meat and chicken meals due to their high nutritive value and agreeable taste. Meat meals have an excellent source of high-quality protein, vitamin and mineral [1,2]. Raw materials of bad microbial quality, bad personal hygiene and consumption at room temperature lead to contamination of foods with pathogenic bacteria especially Salmonellae and coliforms, causing potential risk to human [3]. Incorrect habits responsible for microbial food borne illness reported [4] and typically involve cross contamination of raw and cooked foods, poor cooking and storage at unsuitable temperature. Staphylococcal food poisoning has rapid onset and its symptoms include nausea and strong vomiting with or without diarrhoea [5]. Salmonella spp can persist on final raw products. Disease can result when these products are handled without good hygienic practices, not properly cooked and/or subjected to temperature abuse [6]. It is considered that the presence of Salmonella spp in products makes it unsafe for human consumption [7,8].

E.coli is an important organism involved in food – borne disease, it is considered as a good indicator of possible fecal contamination [9] . Therefore, the present study was planned out for determination of APC, Enterobacteriaceae & coliforms counts, isolation and identification of E.coli, salmonella and staph. aureusfor ready to eat meat and chicken meals including meat ,chicken ,beef kofta and chicken kofta.

Materials and Methods

Collection of Samples

Sixty random samples of cooked chicken and meat meals including meat, chicken, beef kofta and chicken kofta (15 of each) were collected from different restaurants. Each sample was kept in a separate sterile plastic bag, put in an ice box then transferred to the laboratory under complete aseptic condition without any retard for the examination bacteriologically.

Preparation of Samples [10]:

To 25 grams of the sample, 225 ml of sterile peptone water was added thoroughly mixed sterile blender for 2.5 minutes, from which tenth fold serial dilution was prepared. The prepared samples were subjected to the following bacteriological investigations:

  1. Determination of APC [10].
  2. Determination of total Enterobacteriaceae count [11] using Violet Red Bile Glucose agar.
  3. Determination of total coliform count [10] using Violet Red Bile agar medium.
  4. Isolation and identification of Enteropathogenic coli [12]: it was applied by using Macconkey broth as enriched broth and EMB as plating media.
  5. Isolation and Identification of salmonellae [13].
  6. Isolation and identification of staph.aureus [10].

Result

The results of bacteriological examination of cooked chicken and meat meals samples revealed that APC and coliform were highest in chicken kofta followed by beef kofta then chicken then meat. While, Enterobacteriaceae was highest in chicken kofta followed by chicken then beef kofta then meat. Isolation and identification of E.coli in the examined samples revealed that the incidence of E.coli was26.67%in chicken, 20% in both of beef kofta and 13.33 in meat,12 isolates of E.coli represented as 13.33% from meat with serotypes O26 : H11 (6.67%) and O111 : H4 (6.67)20% from beef kofta with serotypes O26 : H11(13.33%) and O124(6.67%). 20%from chicken with serotypes O78(6.67%), O127 : H6(6.67%)and O146 : H21(6.67%). 26.67% from chicken kofta with serotypes O26 : H11(13.33%), O91 : H21(6.67%)and O121 : H7(6.67%). Isolation and identification of salmonella in the examined samples revealed that the incidence of salmonella was equal in meat, beef kofta and chicken (6.67%) while in chicken kofta was the highest (20%). 6.67%from meat with serotype S. Heidelberg 6.67% from beef kofta with serotype S. Montevideo 6.67% from chicken with serotype S. Kentuckey 20%from chicken kofta with serotypes S. Anatum (6.67%), S. Infantis(6.67%)and S. Typhimurium(6.67%). Isolation and identification of staphylococcus aureus revealed that there are 21 isolates of staph.aureus were isolated from examined samples represented as 20% from meat,40% from beef kofta,33.33% from chicken and 46.67% from chicken kofta.

Discussion

APC is very important for evaluation of sanitary condition of cooked meat meals. limits suggested for total aerobic bacterial count I in various foods range from105 to 107 microbes /g.(EEC,2005). It is evident from the results recorded in (Table 1) that the APC/g of the examined samples of cooked chicken and meat meals ranged from 2.1×103 to 1.7×104 with an average of 6.03×103 ± 1.45×103 /(cfu/g) for meat, 4.6×103 to 2.9×104 with an average 9.91×103 ± 2.18×103/(cfu/g) for meat kofta, , 3.5×103to 3.9×104 with an average 8.58×103 ± 1.65×103 / (cfu/g) for chicken and 6.0×103 to 7.7×104 with an average 2.03×104 ± 0.43×104 (cfu/g) for chicken kofta. The current results nearly similar to the results recorded by Sobieh (2014) found that the mean value of RTE kofta was 1.83×104cfu/gm, while higher results was recorded by [14] who found that the mean value of APC of RTE kofta was 8.51×105cfu/g, also higher results was recorded by [14] found that the mean APC of RTE chicken meals was 1.9×104 cfu/g and in RTE meat meals was1.2×104 cfu/g.high incidence of APC , may indicate that the cooking process was inadequate, or post cooking contamination had occurred, or the length of time and temperature control in storage or display facilities was inadequate to prevent bacterial contamination ,or that a combination of these factors was involved [15].

Table 1: Analytical results of Aerobic plate counts/g (APC) in the examined samples of cooked meat and chicken meals (n=15).

Table 2: Analytical results of Aerobic plate counts/g (APC) in the examined samples of cooked meat and chicken meals (n=15).

*Center for Food Safety (2014) for cooked meat meals **EOS (2005) for heat treated poultry meat.

Results given in Table 2 revealed that the Acceptability of the examined samples of cooked meat and chicken meals based on their APC was (86.67% ) of meat samples were accepted samples but (13.33% ) of meat samples were unaccepted ,(73.33%) of beef kofta samples were accepted but( 26.67% )of beef kofta samples were unaccepted,(80%) of chicken samples were accepted but( 20%) of chicken samples were unaccepted and (60%) of chicken kofta were accepted but (40 % )of chicken kofta were unaccepted. Results achieved in (Table 3) showed that the mean values of total Enterobacteriaceae counts/g in the examined samples of cooked chicken and meat meals were 3.16×103 ± 0.72×103 / (cfu/g) for meat, 5.25×103 ± 0.86×103/(cfu/g) for meat kofta,,6.53×103 ± 1.24×103/ (cfu/g)for chicken and 9.14×103 ± 2.06×103/ (cfu/g) for chicken kofta. the current results was nearly similar to recorded by Shaltout et al.(2015) who found that the mean values of enterobacteriacea of RTE kofta was 7.15×103/(cfu/g) ,while higher results recorded by [16] who found the mean value of enterobacteriacae of street vended kofta samples was 1.5×107cfu/g.

Table 3: Analytical results of Enterobacteriaceae counts/g in the examined samples of cooked meat and chicken meals (n=15).

Table 4: Analytical results of coliform counts/g in the examined samples of cooed meat and chicken meals (n=15).

Table 5: Incidence and serotyping of Enteropathogenic E.coli isolated from the examined samples of cooked meat meals (n=15).

From the results in (Table 4), it is obvious that the mean values of total coliform counts/(cfu/g) in the examined samples of cooked chicken and meat meals were 7.43×102 ± 1.05×102 /(cfu/g) for meat, 1.06×103 ± 0.19×102/(cfu/g) for meat kofta, 9.18×102 ± 2.07×103 /(cfu/g) for chicken and 3.32×103 ± 0.45×103 /(cfu/g) for chicken kofta. The current results was nearly similar to the results recorded by [17] who found that the mean values of coliform was 5.17×102 ±1.2×102 cfu/g. while higher results was recorded by [18] who found the mean value of coliform count of kofta sandwiches was 1.8×105/(cfu/g). From the results in Tables 5 and 6 showed that there are 12 isolates of E.coli represented as 13.33% from meat with serotypes O26 : H11 (6.67%) and O111 : H4(6.67)20% from beef kofta with serotypes O26 : H11 (13.33%)and O124(6.67%).20%from chicken with serotypes O78(6.67%), O127 : H6 (6.67%) and O146 : H21(6.67%).26.67% from chicken kofta with serotypes O26 : H11(13.33%), O91 : H21(6.67%)and O121 : H7(6.67%).

Table 6: Incidence and serotyping of EnteropathogenicE.coli isolated from the examined samples of cooked chicken meals (n=15).

From Tables 7 and 8 showed the incidence and serotyping of salmonella isolated from cooked meat and chicken meals is 6.67% from meat identified serologically as S. Heidelberg O4,5,12:Hr:1,26.67% from beef kofta identified serologically as S. MontevideoO6,7,14:Hg,m,s:1,7,26.67% from chicken identified serologically as S. Kentuckey O8,20:Hi:Z6 20%from chicken kofta identified serologically as S. AnatumO1,9,12:Hg,m:1,7(6.67%), S. Infantis O6,7,14:Hr:1,5(6.67%)and S. TyphimuriumO1,4,5,12:Hi:1,2(6.67%). Salmonella microorganisms were previously isolated from cooked meat meals by [19,20]. Also, salmonella failed to be isolated from cooked meat meals by [21]. The symptoms the symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, fever and abdominal cramps [22]. The results in Tables 9 and 10 reported that staph .aureus was isolated from20% of meat,40%of meat kofta,33.33%of chicken and 46.67%of chicken kofta .such organism was isolated previously from ready to eat meat meals by [19,21] who isolated staph aureus from cooked samples the presence of staph .aureus in RTE meat meals may be due to their contamination from food handlers, bad cleaned equipment’s or post processing contamination [23-25].

Table 7: Incidence and serotyping of Salmonellae isolated from the examined samples of cooked meat meals (n=15).

Table 8: Incidence and serotyping of Salmonellae isolated from the examined samples of cooked chicken meals (n=15).

Table 9: Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the examined samples of cooked meat meals (n=15).

Table 10: Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the examined samples of cooked chicken meals (n=15).

References

Research Article

Bacteriological Examination of Cooked Meat and Chicken Meals

Fahim A Shaltout1*, Hanan M Lamada2 and Ehsan A M Edris3

Author Affiliations

1Department Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary, Egypt

2Animal Health Research, Tanta University, Egypt

3Tanta University Hospitals, Egypt

Received: March 19, 2020 | Published: April 15, 2020

Corresponding author: Fahim A Shaltout, Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary, Benha University, Egypt

DOI: 10.26717/BJSTR.2020.25.004444

Abstract

Sixty random samples (15 of each) were collected from different restaurants to evaluate their bacteriological quality The mean values of APC, Enterobacteriaceae, coliform counts(cfu/g) were 6.03×103 ± 1.45×103, 3.16×103 ± 0.72×103, 7.43×102 ± 1.05×102 for meat, 8.58×103 ± 1.65×103 ,6.53×103 ± 1.24×103, 9.18×102 ± 2.07×103 for chicken, 9.91×103 ± 2.18×103, 5.25×103 ± 0.86×103, 1.06×103 ± 0.19×102 for beef kofta and 2.03×104 ± 0.43×104, 9.14×103 ± 2.06×103, 3.32×103 ± 0.45×103 for chicken kofta, respectively. The results showed that 12 isolates of E.coli were identified from examined ready to eat chicken and meat meals with different percentages(O26 : H11, O111 : H4, O124, O78,O91 : H21, O121 : H7, O127 : H6, O146 : H21) E.coli strains were serologically identified from such examined meals, there are 6 isolates of salmonella were identified from examined samples. Also, there are 21 isolates of staph. aureus were isolated from examined samples represented as 20% from meat,40% from beef kofta,33.33% from chicken and 46.67% from chicken kofta.